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Homemade Non-Slip Hangers

DSCN4326My wonderful husband went to a national store on his own and scored me 4 new shirts for $8 each. They are super stylish, nautically striped with a boat neck. I love them and him for getting them for me for no reason at all (not a birthday or anniversary or anything!). But when I started hanging them up, nothing would stay on the hangers. These didn’t come with the clever little hanging straps that somehow always manage to be showing when I wear a top with them. After fidgeting with the shirts and hangers for several minutes I remembered something I saw somewhere about using hot glue to add texture to the hangers to hold wide necked shirts. I really wish I could remember where I saw it to give the truly clever person props, but alas I have no idea. Even if it was on Pinterest, the odds are it wouldn’t take me to the original link anyway, so thank you mystery person.

Here is what you do. Get your cheap plastic hangers out and heat up that glue gun. Starting about the middle of the side of the hanger (mine had handy open hook areas) paint a curvy line with your glue gun. Add a slightly thicker dot of glue at the end. Let them cool. Viola! Non-slip hangers for all those fashionable wide-necked shirts and slippery fabrics.

TIP  – If you did this on plastic hangers, should you get rid of the shirts, you can easily peel the glue off the hanger and return it to its original state.

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Saturday Project: Fabric Tool Caddy for Chairs

Chair_FullFor those of us who home school or who do any crafting, you know finding a spot for your or the kids items that are regularly used can be a challenge. Wouldn’t it be great if your pens and scissors, or the kids pencils, crayons, and rulers, were all handy right on your chair? Today’s project gives you just that! The folks at Creating Keepsakes have put together this video tutorial for making your own fabric tool caddy for  chairs. Think of all the fun fabric patterns you could use to keep yourself and the kids organized!

Borax and Sugar to Kill Ants

thRecently I posted about using vinegar and chalk to deter ants, but what happens with more aggressive ants who don’t seem to take the hint? A good way to rid your house of ants is to use borax and sugar. In a bowl mix 1 part borax to 3 parts sugar and dissolve fully in water. Soak cotton balls with the solution. Place the borax and sugar soaked cotton ball in the lid of a two-liter or 20 oz. soda in the area where you have seen the ants. Allow the ants to come to the cotton ball and feed. Resist the urge to kill them there. You want the ants to take the solution back to their home. Over 1-2 days you should notice that the ants stop coming. If they re-appear, simply repeat putting the cotton ball out. After 1-2 treatments the ants should be gone.

Extra solution can be stored in a peanut butter jar or other recycled container. Mark it well so people know it is not for eating. Because you are using borax, be sure to store the solution and place the cotton balls away from where kids can get into them.

Saturday Project: Pallet-Backed Bookshelf

DSC_0060I love using bookshelves for organization. For books, toys, china…you name it, I like to organize it on a bookshelf.  Our very first Saturday Project was adding fabric backing to a bookshelf! Imagine my delight when I found the tutorial from Lisa at Over the Big Moon for making a pallet-backed bookshelf. I can’t wait to do this to a black bookcase in the kids playroom!

Back to School

BACKPACK3Back to school time, whether at a traditional school coming off a long summer break or a home-schooler returning from a vacation, can be a time of strife and chaos as everyone tries to get back into the “normal” routine.  As with most times of change, a combination of organization and flexibility are key. Here are some of my favorite back-to-school tips:

  • Homeschool – Here is a collection of home school tips and organizational ideas that have worked well for my family. Some of these are home-school specific, but many can be used by families no matter how you decide to educate your kids.
  • School Supply Stock-Up – A list of school supplies to stock up on whenever they are on sale
  • Back-to-School Schedule – Tips for getting your kids back onto a school (and not a vacation) clock
  • Back-to-School Trial Run – Making a day to “practice” going to school
  • Morning Cards – A simple system for taking the chaos out of busy mornings
  • Packing Lunches – Tips for setting up an easy-to-use, kid friendly lunch packing station
  • Lunch Notes – Cute notes to put into your kids lunches
  • Must-Have School Items – A list of must haves
  • Color-Coded Family – How to organized your family through color – even in their school supplies!
  • Family Calendar –  A must-have for busy families
  • Monday Morning Organization – Start your week off right with these tips for Mondays

Even though we don’t actually go back to school at this time of year anymore it is still one of my favorite times. My husband is a teacher so he does go back at this time of year, and it is always a time of transition from summer to a fall schedule. This is my “New Years”! We set goals for the next 12 months, stock up on school supplies (the only kind of shopping I actually like), and in general use this as a time to re-set the family.

Buying A Car

car_salesmanWe just purchased a new-to-us car. While the process never seems to be simple, there are a few tips and tricks that can make the process easier.

  1. Get organized before you go. Before you even head to a dealership gather all your financial paperwork. You will need recent pay stubs or award letters, a bank statement showing where these are deposited, the correct name, address, birthdate, and social security number of anyone that will be on any financing. You can even apply for financing (if you must) and walk into a dealership with a check from your bank or finance company before you ever look at a car.
  2. Research! Research! Research! It is best to head to a dealership know what car your want and what options are must-haves and what you can live without. Whether you are buying a new or used car, putting together a list of what you want and don’t want can be very helpful. You should also research values and reliability of any car you are considering and your trade-in. Dealerships use NADA for used car values and pricing. Know what your car is worth and what the car you are buying should be priced at. Check out reliability and other reviews at sites like Edmunds. If you aren’t sure what kind of car you want prior to visiting a dealership (i.e. you need to see what good used cars they have), don’t sign on the dotted line until you have taken a day to pray, think, and research.
  3. Test real-life driving situations. In our family, my husband does all the dealership stuff and I do the organization and research. But whenever we are close to buying a car, he brings it by the house and we pile all the kids, car seats, and things we regularly use or keep in the car (i.e. our beach chairs) into the prospective car. Then we drive around town to places we regularly visit. This allows us to see if the kids really are comfortable in the back seat and if it is realistic for daily life. We also test out favorite suitcase and cooler in the trunk/cargo area to make sure those items that we travel with the most will fit.
  4. Consider gas and insurance costs when purchasing a car. Be sure you contact your auto insurance company to find out what your rate would be for the car you are considering. Understand the gas mileage on the new car and calculate the increased gas expense or savings from the new car.

Doing your homework and having information gathered before you visit a dealership will greatly improve the process.

TIP: Average cars will last 10 years or 120,000 without significant maintenance costs. Instead of buying a new car, when your car is paid off continue making “payments” into a savings account. Then, when you do need (not want!) to replace your car, take the cash you have saved to pay for a good, reliable 1-2 year old used car. Cars 1-2 years old are the best deal as they are generally still in good shape and have a lot of life left, but the depreciation that happens the second you drive off the lot has already happened.

Saturday Project: Pocket Pillow Runner

pocket pillow runnerMy kids always have a book and some little trinket they want with the in bed. Inevitably, something gets lost in the covers and other stuffed animals they sleep with. I was very excited when I found B. Jane brewing’s instructions for this lovely, felt pocket pillow runner. This lays under your child’s pillow and has a pocket for a book, glasses, or other small trinket kids want close at bedtime.

 

 

Photo Credit: bjanebrewing.com